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Monthly Archives: October 2014

DIY Sherlock Holmes Costume


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So this Halloween, Trevor, my minion from last year, said he wanted to be the world’s greatest detective. I suggested Sherlock Holmes and after we looked at a few images on Google, he enthusiastically agreed. I think it was the magnifying glass and the pipe that really clinched it.

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I’m calling this post DIY Sherlock Holmes, but mostly it’ll be DIY Sherlock Holmes hat.  I did make the coat too, but I just followed a pattern, McCall’s #M6641.  We will not be telling Trevor that I made his coat from a “girl’s pattern” since you know how 9 year old boys can be.


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I made the coat shown here in yellow, but without the hood and the collar instead. Also, I didn’t bother putting pockets or a lining in it since it’s just a costume after all. Once I completed the coat, I made the cape  and attached it around the outside of the collar. To do that, I cut two big circles from my fabric, as big as I could.  My fabric was 45″ so it was just a little smaller than that in diameter.  I cut a hole in the middle big enough for his neck and collar then cut an opening all the way down the front. I sewed the two circles together (one for the inside of the cape, one for the outside of it), and attached it to the coat.  Moving on.

For the hat, I started with two brown baseball caps that I puchased for a couple of dollars each from EBay.

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After turning them back-to-back, fit one over the other.

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It should be noted that you should do this with the caps on the head of the person who will be wearing them so that you get a correct fit.  One you are confident of the fit, hot glue the two hats together.  I just spot-glued them around the inside band of the top hat.

Next, I covered the hat with the same fabric I had used to make the coat. First thing, I made a pattern piece that matched the wedge shape that makes up the hat.  This is what I mean

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The top of the ball cap is made up of six of these put together.  I made a pattern piece to match these out of craft paper.  To do this I took the piece of paper, laid it over the cap and scored along the seams with my fingernail  there was a little trial and error with this method, so if you know of a better way I encourage you to use it.

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Once you have the pattern piece in hand, cut out six of them, making sure to add a half inch seam allowance all the way around.  When you sew them together, I recommend using a quarter inch seam allowance as you need for it to fit over the hat and if it is exactly the same size, you will struggle.  Start sewing the wedges together, pieces should be right sides together and sew a straight seam from tip down one side.  When you finish adding the sixth wedge, sew the first to the last to make a continuous ring of wedges.  Clip seams at curves and turn it right side out.  It should look like this

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Iron all seams flat.

Next you will make the ear flaps.  Use the same pattern piece you used for the wedges, but cut the tup off to make it blunt-ended.  Cut out 4 of them then sew them into two sets with the straight side left open.  If I was thinking, I would have sandwiched the tie for these into the tip of the flap, but since I didn’t, I just tacked them on in a later step.

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So now, I matched up these ear flaps on the outside of my pieced-together cap, lining each up with a wedge on an opposite side of the cap. Stitch these on across the straight side, lining it up with the bottom hem of the cap. Like so…

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It looks a little weird now, but it’ll get better.  Now, flip the ear flaps up and iron a hem along the bottom band of the cap. You may want to slip it onto the baseball caps to get an idea of how big of a hem you’ll need, but mine was about a half inch, all the way around.  Once you’ve ironed it in place, sew it around, close to the fold making sure you have your ear flaps pointing up as you do.

Before you permanently add this to your hat, you will want to to first cover the bills of the hat.  I only covered the tops of the bills, leaving the underside plain brown.  I made a pattern for the bill using craft paper, and employing the same (rather crappy) method that I did when making the pattern for the cap. Trial and error, a little wine, and lots of patience.  I ended up with this

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A little blurry (must’ve been the wine), but you get the idea. Cut two of these from your fabric, then zig-zag, surge, or use liquid sealer around the edge to keep it from fraying.

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Now I hot-glued these to each brim of the hat.

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My fabric worked well with hot glue and left no visible traces or bleed-through marks.  If you find that your fabric isn’t as forgiving, you may want to try traditional fabric glue.  Just be sure to give it time to dry before moving on to subsequent steps.

Alright now, almost done!  One more thing you need to do before putting your homemade cap onto the finished hat is to tack on the ties that hold the flaps up. As I mentioned before, it would have made more sense to include these in the ear flap construction, but I wasn’t thinking ahead at the time.  So instead, I took a 8″ length of ribbon (I found one at Joann’s that looks more like a shoe lace) folded the end over and machine tacked it to the top inside of each ear flap

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Now give the cap one final ironing and fit it over your baseball caps, lining up the ear flaps on the sides and the center seams in the front and the back.  If your baseball cap has a button at the top, clip a few stitches at the point of the cap and pass it through to the outside.  Trim away any excess fabric at the tip of the cap.  Once you are happy with the overall fit, glue that sucker in place with dabs of hot or fabric glue around the inside of the bottom band. Allow it to dry then tie the ribbon at the top of the hat.  Trim ribbon if necessary. I also glued the knot in place because the hat really isn’t constructed to allow the flaps to hang down and I didnt want my son to be tempted to futz with them.

Here is the finished cap…

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He really does LOVE that magnifying glass.

With the coat and hat done, I gathered up the other pieces of his costume. I purchased his beloved pipe and magnifying glass on EBay.  The set cost me $5.99. He had some navy dress pants and dark socks.  Still need to get him some shoes but with Halloween still a few weeks off, I’m feeling ok about that. He might also get a white button down dress shirt, but I’m not sure if he needs one since I made him this fabulous ascot that covers his neck.

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I used this tutorial that that I found on Pinterest, which was very straightforward. I downsized it a bit for my 9-year old.  I’m didn’t bother giving his a pointed bottom since I knew it would be tucked into his jacket like so…

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So it’s pretty much all done except for the Trick or Treating.  And I don’t need to tell you that he loves it.

One costume down, one to go!  Stay tuned for my older son’s costume to be posted as soon as I finish it.

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