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Monthly Archives: August 2015

Beverage Holders for the Yard

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At the beginning of the summer, we bought a new house that has a fabulous back yard made for entertaining.  I decided that some backyard beverage holders would come in handy when we had friends over to play Bags (or as some call it “Cornhole”).

I figured that the body of the holder could be made from a tin can but wanted it big enough to hold a can plus a coozie, or alternately to hold a Keg (Solo) cup. I thought I might use a Progresso Soup can, but was shopping at Target and found these in the $1 – $3 – $5 section. They were $3 each.

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I liked that it was sturdy and a little bigger than a Progresso can, and we can put the covers on them when they aren’t in use.

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I made a decorative cover for them using fabric and Modge Podge.  I first made a pattern with plain paper. I measured the height and circumference of the can and cut out a pattern that was  the height x the circumference plus 1/2″.

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Use your pattern to cut out a fabric piece for each of the cans you’re covering.

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GO TARHEELS!

OK, so now you want to cover the outside of the can with Modge Podge. I used the kind made for outdoor use figuring that these might occasionally see some rain.

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Once it’s covered in Modge Podge, wrap your fabric around the can overlapping the ends, and smooth out any air bubbles.  Now you will cover it with another layer of Modge Podge on the outside of the fabric.

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Let it dry completely (it dries clear) according to the instructions. This might take a while if you are in a humid environment. Once it’s completely dry, add a second coat. I think I did a total of three coats, allowing time to dry in between.

Once it was good and dry, I set out to add the post to it.  I had purchased yard long 1/4″ threaded poles for the task. First off, you need to pierce the bottom of the can. To do this, first locate the center of the can bottom and mark it with a pen.

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Now, using a hammer, pierce the bottom center with a big nail.

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Okie doke. Now place your can on the floor, bottom up, put one end of your threaded pole onto the hole and gently tap the other end with a hammer until you have penetrated the can.

Temporarily remove the pole from the can.  Your completed project will sit on the threaded pole in the following order:

Hex Nut

Washer

Can Botton

Washer

Hex Nut

So, starting at the bottom, thread on a hex nut, followed by a washer leaving about 1/4″ – 1/2″ of pole showing at the top.  Apply Gorilla glue around the washer like so…

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Now, put your can on the post and add a ring on gorilla glue inside the can bottom right around the post.

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Try to do it a tad more neatly than I did.  Now add your washer and the final nut.  Screw the nut so that it matches evenly with the top of the post. Now adjust the bottom nut, the one underneath on the outside of the can, so that all five layers – nut, washer, can, washer, nut – are squeezed together tight. This will make your can sit nice and stable on top of the post with no wobbling.

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Double check that the post ends right at the top of the nut and not before or after it.  Too high and your can will wobble around the bottom of the holder, too low and you risk having your creation lose the nut and come apart.

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Let the Gorilla glue dry per the manufacturer’s instructions.

The cup holders are pretty much ready for use now except…well except that I wasn’t completely happy with them. I didn’t like having that raised nut in the bottom when I put my beer bottle in it.  To correct for this problem, I lined the bottom with two pieces of thick (6mm) fun foam. Using the can as a template, I cut out two circles of fun foam.  Each looked like this.

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Now, in only ONE of the circles, cut out a hole in the center.

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It doesn’t have to be pretty because it won’t show.   Now hot glue that puppy to the bottom inside of the can.

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Now take the uncored circle and hot glue it right on to the first one.

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There you have it!  A nice level, comfy cushion upon which your beverage can rest. All that is left to do is to plant them in the yard and crack open a beverage.

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Check them out!  They keep your beverage handy and up off the grass where they might get knocked over or licked by the dog.

Now get out there and make your own set before the summer is over!

Rosette Wreath from Coffee Filters and Sheet Music

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Helloooooo friends. I know, I know, long time no blog.  I have no excuse, so please just accept my apologies. Today I’m giving a quick tutorial on the above wreath I made using coffee filters and sheet music.

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The coffee filters I used are the cheap, round, ruffle type.  For the wreath (it’s on a 14″ form) I made about 115 rosettes of which about 70 were constructed from the coffee filters.

So first off, you want to use a dry (no steam), hot iron and flatten out your coffee filters. Do these in batches since the humidity in the air will try to return them to their natural ruffle state.  I think I did about a dozen at a time.

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Now using a pencil I drew a spiral on one starting at the outside edge heading towards the middle.

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The trick here is to try to make your spiral sections about the same width like so

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Ok, now I don’t show this in the picture, but stack about 6 coffee filters neatly together then cut along the line – so that you’re cutting out 6 at a time. If you have sharper scissors than I, stack more at a time to cut more at a time.

Each should now look like this…

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Now, heat up your glue gun and start rolling.  Starting at the outside edge of the circle, roll the end in tightly.

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Keep rolling all the way to the center until it looks like this.

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The rosettes will be wound very tightly, but I like them a little looser (like I like my men😉) so I held the rosette in my palm then made like a “cage” with my hands and shook the rosette around for a few seconds. This allows it to unwind just a bit, leaving you with something that is less bud-like, and more rosette-Ish.

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Looking good! Now turn out the little coin of paper that once was the center of the coffee filter and now is at the very bottom of your flower.

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 This is where you’re going to put a liberal amount of hot glue.  Once you’ve done that, let the rest of the rosette rest on the glue and take a few seconds before the glue dries to make any adjustments you think are necessary.  Remember they are supposed to mimic their natural counterparts so you don’t want complete uniformity.

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You have just mastered the paper rosette.

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For the sheet music rosettes, I had bought a book of sheet music at my local thrift store awhile back, knowing that I would find a good craft project for it some day.  The day finally came!  I ripped out about 45 pages and, with about six sheets stacked together at a time, traced and cut out a circle.

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Now just repeat the above steps for all of these circles to make your sheet music rosettes.

Once you are done rolling, rolling, rolling those flowers, it’s time to assemble your wreath. I forgot to photograph along the way, but it’s super easy.

Get yourself a 14 – 16 inch styrofoam wreath form. The one I got (cheap cheap at Walmart) was green, so I wrapped it in wide white satin ribbon.  This is so that the form wouldn’t peek through in between the rosettes. I used hot glue to attach the ribbon to the form. Next, start adhering your rosettes, using a good sized blob of hot glue for each.  Put the glue on the bottom of a rose, pick a spot on the wreath and hold it in place for a few seconds.  Grab your next flower, glue it, then place it right next to the first one.  Continue this way, working your way around the wreath. Be sure to scatter the sheet music ones amidst the white ones. I made 6 white roses for every 4 music ones just as an FYI.

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And there you have it. A big, beautiful, gorgeous wreath that maybe cost $10. If anyone has a book loving friend who’s getting married, you could offer to make her a wedding bouquet out of book pages. Gorgeous, creative, incredibly inexpensive and she can keep it forever.  Or you can dye the coffee filters any color, or use colored paper even and make a pretty wreath for any occasion.  The possibilities are endless.

Best of luck with your own wreath!